Real Estate broker Rod Vandenburg to Brandon – “The apple didn’t fall far from the tree.”

BrandonVandenburg-mugshot

Brandon Vandenburg – mugshot post verdict

Rod Vandenburg - at son's gang rape-trial

Real Estate broker Rod Vandenburg at son’s gang rape trial, demonstrating more bad decisions.

Update:  GUILTY.

It didn’t take the second jury much longer than the first to convict Brandon Vandenburg…and shortly after the Saturday evening verdict was read, Brandon’s collegiate sweater was exchanged for county colors. 

Presentation matters

On Friday social media was atwitter with the attire Rodney Vandenburg chose,  as shot by News Channel 5.  

Thank God afterward, someone gave the fifty-something year old, a clue.

On the final day of trial, Rod Vandenberg  showed up for court in a way that would at least, benefit the seriousness of the gang-rape trial of son, Brandon. Rod showed up in a suit.

Okay.  Not a suit that fits; but at least, a suit.  Rod’s attire however, goes to his over-all bad decision making.  Or, put another way.  “How did we get here?” 

Rod Vandenburg - in a suit

Rod Vandenburg:  Beau Brummel spinning in grave.

I’m getting there.

Family insights

Have confirmed from two friends of Rod’s.

  1. At age fourteen Rod hired a “working girl” for Brandon.
  2. Rod has been bragging about his conquests and showing videos of his having sex with women, for years.
  3. Rod’s criminal past involved an assault on his now, ex-wife.

When I asked “why are men still friends with Rod” one answer was,  “alcohol played a role” (which I rejected.)  

But the more troublesome answer was, Media:

“Palm Springs – Palm Desert, it’s a small place and what’s happened didn’t get much play out here.  Rod’s been a successful broker.”

(That’s correct.  While the nation has been focused on campus rapes, there’s been zero coverage in the Desert Sun.)

However, both individuals I spoke with didn’t mind speaking for the simple reason that apparently, Rod has shown his videoed sex acts with women for a long, long time.  In fact – and this is just a guess, but what might be true, is,  It might be much harder to find a man Rod Vandenburg, the successful real estate broker, hasn’t shown a sex tape to in the Palm Springs area

Rod Vandenburg - Pacicific Coast Properties - Father of Brandon

Rod Vandenburg – father of Brandon Vandenburg

Rod Vandenburg's Pacific Coast Properties

Rod Vandenburg’s Pacific Coast Properties

Rod’s a busy guy.  Also with Home Quest Real Estate

Gotta love the email, “Rod4real”  

Rodney Vandenburg - Home Qwest

However, I do keep hearing one thing from those in the Palm Springs area.

Some feel sorry for everyone involved; but add,

“The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.”

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About bonnie russell

It's not about me....but working with and sometimes against attorneys, I *do* find interesting people doing interesting things.
This entry was posted in date rape, Media, misogyny, Rape, Vanderbilt University Sex crimes and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

73 Responses to Real Estate broker Rod Vandenburg to Brandon – “The apple didn’t fall far from the tree.”

  1. Moms Hugs says:

    It’s a very old trick Rod learned long ago – how to co-opt men who ‘own’ the town/media for their silence or risk losing their own reputations for participating. He didn’t just “buy” Brandon sex at age 14, he also bought his son’s silence. Brandon’s GIGGLING heard on the videos… like dad giggled when he shared his videos with his son… and might I add, likely his son’s man-bros we’ve all seen testifying. I’m sure there are more ‘dudes’ from Brandon’s past life who were happy not to be in the loop this time around.

    Like

  2. Granny says:

    Give the father a break, he may have just flown in from California. He still has a job.

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    • Why would I want to do that? Separately, you’re wrong. He did not just fly in.

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    • Justice baby says:

      Not for long hopefully.!!!
      This man is a pig.
      I should know.He assulted me..The police know.
      In time…
      Now that this is over..Rod can be investigated for his crimes.
      He destroyed that boy.
      And has hurt many people.
      Rod is a discusting parent.
      I will make sure he answers now fir how he treated his kids and what he has dine to woman.
      For the record. .He slugged me twice and continued for two months to sexual harrass me.
      I had to wait..
      But be was reported.
      He also threatened to kill me!!.
      Big mistake..
      So now ill make sure if I can his life is an open book.
      And maybe many will see justice.
      I hope Rod reads this..Because you messed with the wrong mother..
      You are a sick bastard.

      Like

  3. Moms Hugs says:

    Reporter tweeted she left due to medical issues. Are you saying she then called the TV station to say Perez had her removed? He also tried to confuse the jury by mis-stating the law about being drunk is a defense. He’s either a dumb-azz or, given his past record, he’s toying with the judge to try for another mistrial. Nothing in this case would surprise me anymore.

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    • I believe you’re referring to a juror who was excused for medical reasons.

      The latest issue stems from yesterday – apparently a woman in the hallway was beginning to say something that was kinda empathetic to the Situation adding that she had been in a similar situation and Perez reportedly said,

      “Oh were you drunk?!”

      This surprised her. She kept her distance and returned to the courtroom. However, today and possibly after being reported by Perez, the bailiffs (who are there to protect the rights of the citizens, which some seem to too which some Forget) took the word of Perez and removed her from the courtroom, and she was told not to come back.

      I learned this as I heard her call-in the Station and she was quite surprised.

      I’m even more surprised as some of Tennessee’s not-so-bright are on Facebook, complaining she was wrong, under the Nick’s heading: “Drama in the Courtroom.”

      Apparently they don’t understand the basics.

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      • charli simmons says:

        i heard her version today. she was not in the hallway and she approached the defendant’s family and perez…told them she recently just went thru something like they were going thru. but she admitted she was lying. she wasn’t raped. she had been in court on a civil matter. then she brought up the twins and how awful it was that they had to listen to this. we in tennessee do understand the basics, bonnie. we also understand manners, decorum and common sense. this woman was obviously from either the north or california.

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      • Oh Charli, you poor thing. I heard her call-in. It’s a little thing called “Live-stream.” She made it clear it wasn’t a rape case…but she was trying to express empathy. Apparently you don’t understand manners, decorum and common sense or, technology. Bless your heart.

        But you all do right well, when you try to avoid things. For instance, in the Wortman case, the school board deleted his “I’m an action, law and order” guy. Wortman, who three times tried to kill his wife, (including from jail) pretty much blows your “manners, decorum and common sense” argument, right out of the water.

        Bless your heart.

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  4. Have they announced a date for the sentencing?

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  5. Jae Kwon says:

    So what ever happened to those charges from Brandon being on a middle school campus and assualting the security guard — DId those just get dropped?

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  6. Yes. Early July. Will be happy to cover that of course.

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  7. Moms Hugs says:

    This sobering verdict gives new meaning to the “long arm of the law” ~ stretched tenuously across the spectrum of digital technology. A “long arm” that began with a damaged door someone kicked in. That single unrelated act & the surveillance tape allowed discovery of a horrendous crime in the making. Had it not been for that act & loose lips by the men involved, causing the buzz on campus, well… no one would’ve been the wiser. By now Brandon & Friends would be floating in that NFL nirvana of athlete worship, which would likely provide ever more unwilling & unconscious victims for his cheap B-grade porn. Now THAT is very sobering!

    Thanks, Bonnie, for following this case & offering rather sobering analysis.

    Like

    • Thanks Hugs!

      The DA admits there very likely would have been no prosecution at all, had Brandon Vandenburg et al, not so joyously and inadvertently, provided all the digital evidence via texts, videos, photos and those wonder Google searches, “How to get rid of deleted material.” As hideously as they reacted, most of my loathing is shared equally with Mack Prioleau…the only sober person in the room, who chose to listen to the crime for 30 minutes….then testified a year later, he didn’t know if he would do anything, differently. Mack Prioleau is a special kind of coward.

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      • Moms Hugs says:

        I have a different view of Mack Prioleau, who was assigned to room with Brandon, a total stranger, only a couple of weeks before. We do not know what he had experienced in those 2 weeks, nor do we know what he may have communicated to his parents about Brandon.

        Mack reminds me of my son, who is also a fairly big guy & played tennis at a private high-caliber college. He had a rough time with his freshman roommates – two guys raised in wealthy homes – who scared the crap out of him. By mid-October he couldn’t take anymore & begged me to let him come home. He sounded very depressed & I flew him home immediately. After a very long talk, I called the college to report what he told me. They moved him to a room in a different dorm so he could return to finish the semester. I was not told by the college what happened to those 2 roommates but they were no longer there when he returned & earned his degree 35 years ago.

        I can’t say my son would have reacted the way Mack did or not given those circumstances. However, I can still see the relief on his face as he stepped off the plane & that frightened look in his eyes as he questioned himself about how to handle these cruel situations. It’s easy to judge someone with 20:20 hindsight while not sharing a similar experience.

        It all reminds me of William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies” – a British novel that won many awards & was made into movies, the last in 1990. Guess that betrays my age… hmmm.

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      • The attack was 30 minutes. It’s way past fear of getting beat up or shunned.
        Glad your kid talked to you and you acted…but the most surprising thing about your comment is that the college acted at all. But then, it was a male who complained. A woman complaining would be told to be quiet.

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  8. christopher loman says:

    Justice ! That female lawyer for Vandenburg should feel especially slimey for that big comforting hug she gave him as he was being led out of the courtroom and to his new reality.

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  9. christopher loman says:

    And YES Mack Prioleaus inaction was disgustingly cowardly. Try and tell something different to the mother who gives hugs to the rape victim.

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  10. Moms Hugs says:

    The Tennessean had this to say about do-nothing bystanders generally in January 2015. . .

    And there are times when bystanders fear for their own safety, said Rachel Freeman, vice president of program for the Sexual Assault Center.

    “Intervening in something such as a sexual assault can feel very scary or confusing to a bystander,” Freeman said. “Is this really happening? How do I know it’s really sexual assault? What if I get in trouble? What if I’m wrong? What if I get hurt, too? Sometimes an individual may feel like the victim is in some way responsible or to blame for the situation.”

    Corn, the Vanderbilt senior, said she has seen this on campus despite increased training and education for students through the campus-wide “Green Dot” program, which educates students on what bystanders can and should do to intervene.

    “Everyone on campus says publicly they’re dedicated to interfering when necessary, but I don’t know that’s happening yet, and I think that’s going to take a lot of training,” Corn said.

    “It may be hard to understand from the outside, but I think if you saw someone who you vaguely knew passed out in the hallway, you’d think that’s the friend of so-and-so and they’re safe because of who they’re with,” she said. “If you saw a complete stranger, you might be more likely to intervene.”

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  11. The Desert Sun did write an article during the first trial. That article did a sort of thumbnail of the charges on the way to the football and sports accolades section. While the rest of the media reported on the crime, we heard the crap of “size, skill, and work ethic.” There were quite a few of us who demanded to know why the paper thought they should focus on his sports history. Of course, we were in no way prepared for Brock Turner’s swim stats when those came around. :/

    http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/crime_courts/2015/01/16/brandon-vandenburg-nashville-trial/21894255/

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    • Funny you mention that. I called the Desert Sun twice over the weekend of the third trial. No one was there. Yesterday I wrote the publisher and telephoned another editor….who basically defended their non-coverage by telling me they incorporated the coverage from the Tennessean. I repeatedly stated I could not understand why they were blowing a great opportunity to do some in-depth coverage, forgetting the level of misogyny/apathy towards women in the U.S.

      Oddly enough, I woke up to a message from a reporter, (who has read my blog) from another country – whose publication is covering the case. I would suggest the public demand better coverage from the Desert Sun. As near as I can tell only the Prep school coach had a sense of of how Brandon Vandenburg’s mind worked.

      Like

  12. christopher loman says:

    Ive actually left comments on non Vandenburg articles asking for more coverage from Desert Sun

    Like

  13. christopher loman says:

    They know whats up

    Like

  14. You are exactly right about that.

    Like

  15. christopher loman says:

    The Desert Sun should do an in depth report on Brandys relationship with the White supremicist gangs in da joint, given the fact he served up a white women to 3 black savages. Should be good for at least 25 years of human interest coverage.

    Like

  16. christopher loman says:

    Filner made him do it.

    Like

  17. Sally Spelbring says:

    THANKS BONNIE BUT I THOUGHT WHAT I SAW LAST NITE WAS THE GUY WHO WATCHED AND DID NOTHING WAS FOUND GUILTY

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  18. Not to worry Sally. He’ll be back in news mid-July for sentencing. Will let you know! 🙂

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  19. christopher loman says:

    🙂

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  20. christopher loman says:

    So many Douchbagerie in Cali…..ok everywhere

    Like

  21. christopher loman says:

    I think im a Judge Watkins fan.

    Like

  22. TJ says:

    I have been reading this blog throughout coverage of all of the trials. Great coverage! You provided a lot of insight that the news outlets did not.

    I feel like I’ve read every article and watched much of the coverage about this case, but I could never find a definitive answer to this question. Does anyone know if there was a plea agreement offered to Batey or Vandenburg? I’m guessing that if there were the prosecution was not going below a decade of prison time because after all they did have significant leverage with all the evidence.

    God bless the victim for getting on the stand continuously over three trials, with more possibly coming. Having to carry this around with her is unbearable to think about. The DA Thurman made a very sobering statement post Vandenburg verdict in that there was so much potential for all of those involved and now all those lives are ruined. The victim has to carry this event around with her forever, although she has been able to go very far in school, hopefully she’ll get some peace and be able to trust again. Not only did these men throw away their educational and athletic opportunities by committing these crimes, but look what they did to their families. Batey has a one year old son that won’t see his father free until he’s driving age. He’ll have to explain why his father isn’t at his honors day or ball games. Vandenburg has younger brothers who likely won’t see him outside of a prison until their around 30 years old. They’ll have to ignore and compartmentalize the whispers and stares. I cannot help but feel sorry for all the family members. These guys won’t get out of prison until they are close to 40 if they are lucky. Obviously these men weren’t thinking about the ramifications this would have on the victim and their own families when they committed these terrible crimes, but what I would like to know is whether or not they see the ripple effect this is going to have now. Has it sunk in? Have they changed as people in the last 3 years?

    Bonnie or anyone–Do you have any predictions on the sentences?
    I think Vandenburg and Batey both get 15 years due to lack of protests offenses.
    It seems like Mckenzie will get probation and maybe a suspended sentence. I would imagine Banks would get something, but it is hard to tell as we haven’t heard much about him.

    Like

    • Thank you for reading. I try to cover things that interest me that media seldom addresses. Also, hardly ever know who is reading. So far, the greatest distance was a reporter from the UK, who interviewed me on the day of the EU vote. The reporter wanted to know why sentencing was so different in the Brock Turner case, which I covered here. I was able to provide lots of background on that, having my own complaints with San Jose Mercury news reporter Tracey Kaplan, who acted completely without ethics in a prior matter involving attorney Mike Armstrong.)

      But I digress.

      Am a big fan of Judge Monte Watkins, who strikes me as a wise judge. I am positive the victim will be there to make her statement and I am equally sure it will have an impact on Judge Watkins.

      I don’t see anyone getting “probation” or any kind of suspended sentence. Also, I could be wrong when it comes to Banks, as football disguised as a school sport, is really sports-business, which benefited, (along with every other team in the U.S.) with superior marketing branding with school identity, to become a religion.

      (This is true for much of the nation.)

      As for Batey – a straight up long sentence. Perhaps the maximum. Not only did Batey’s attorney’s opt for the same defense, they weren’t very bright. This has to be annoying for a judge.

      As for Vandenburg – am hoping the obstruction of justice sentence will run consecutively. As Brandon Vandenburg went to great lengths to blame the victim for a scenario of her throwing up that never happened; but also tried his best to delete and destroy evidence. That merits a consecutive sentence.

      Also, my sense is between the trials, both Batey and Vandenburg hardened their positions.
      At the first trial Batey carried a bible and apologized.
      Vandenburg did neither.

      However, by the re-trial…Batey went all-in with female friends and family lining the front rows and tried to make himself, an unwed father between trials, as a choir boy. Batey’s counsel’s goof was not prepping his character witness, a man who stumbled badly, and blurted things that opened the door for the prosecution to reveal, Batey has long had anger and alcohol issues. In fairness, Batey’s legal representation had no case. The female attorney was a nightmare.

      As for Vandenburg – His flat-affect face will hurt him. One of his attorneys was disbarred after his extortion conviction; but the Vandenburg’s opted to keep Perez, a family friend, whose daughter dated Vandenburg in high school. Perez was never up for the job, and presented a stupid defense. He also never sued 20/20 for the video leaks.

      My opinion of Perez couldn’t be any lower. I wanted Vandenburg to be convicted, but I also wanted decent counsel.

      Neither defendant had either.

      Like

  23. dglavin96 says:

    Thank you for your in depth coverage of this case. For whatever reason, it has struck a nerve with me, as it has with many others. Perhaps it’s the arrogance and state of denial among the defendant, his parents and attorneys (Perez in particular) and the fact the verdict in the second trial came shortly after the injustice perpetrated by the judge in the Brock Turner rape case. I’m hoping that justice prevails this time and Vandenburg and Batey receive sentences at the higher end of the range.

    Regarding Vandenburg, you stated that you hope to see the “obstruction of justice” sentence run consecutively with the sentence on the other counts. I don’t believe Vandenburg was charged with obstruction in the second trial. He was convicted of 5 counts of aggravated rape, 2 counts of aggravated sexual battery and one count of unlawful photography. If I’m correct about this, do you have any idea why Vandenburg was not charged with obstruction in the second trial?

    You did some great reporting on the denial of the parents as evidenced by their public statements, social media, reports by friends, etc. I find this infuriating, as it was in the Turner case. Do you have an opinion on whether the parents finally get that their son is guilty of despicable crimes? Based on Vandenburg’s reaction to the second verdict (head shaking, grimacing), it’s clear to me that he doesn’t get it. Hopefully the officials who conduct his presentencing evaluation will agree with me.

    Like

    • A. You’re welcome. Thanks again for reading. As you can see, the case struck a nerve with me, also. I live in San Diego and remain grateful Vandenburg spent just one college semester here. San Diego coeds absolutely dodged a bullet.
      B. You’re right. The obstruction charges melted into “Unlawful photography.” I have no idea why, considering that was the evidence that birthed this slam-dunk case. So my only thought on the subject is, perhaps melting the charges was included in deals with Vandenburg’s, CA co-defendants. But again, that’s just a guess. I should find out. (Great. More digging. 😦 Kidding.)
      C. My opinion of the parents – is split. Vandenburg’s parents were both college athletes. So their denial was based in a way – in reality. Their denial makes sense as for years the reality was the solid fact that: College and professional sports figures traditionally received a “pass” for their criminal behavior.
      Fortunately, the era is ending. I wrote about other college rapes, and the law firms hired to defend, who have their own sexual harassment claims, here.
      D. But separately, both for Brock Turner’s parents – Brock’s mother was completely out to lunch. When Brock Turner was convicted, (Brock was wearing a Navy blue blazer as befitting a preppy image to hear the verdict) of three felony charges: assault with intent to commit rape of an intoxicated woman, sexually penetrating an intoxicated person with a foreign object and sexually penetrating an unconscious person with a foreign object…Brock’s mother, wailed first, and stomped her foot in anger, second. Apparently the family had faith in Stanford’s criminal defense, go-to, the lackluster, Mike Armstrong.
      E. Meanwhile, Brock’s lackluster Armstrong, who did nothing to end the Facebook page “Brock Turner Olympics 2016” until after sentencing, made me realize an odd thing about Stanford. While Stanford is known for graduating many skeezy bros such as Evan Spiegel, who invent high-tech companies; Stanford is hideously behind the curve in journalism and new media. Stanford controls local press in an old-school way, and only now is beginning to learn of people like me who out them.

      Quick digression: This million dollar civil judgment against a tenured Stanford professor was not in local media. Not the San Jose Mercury News, Palo Alto Weekly, and the Palo Alto Daily. (I know they could have, because I sent my column to all three).
      F. However, by any standard, Turner’s family was over-the-top, in “not getting it.” Dan Turner’s “Twenty minutes of action,” but Carleen Turner’s letter to the judge at sentencing, raised the bar for not getting it. Aside from the fact, Carleen Turner never mentioned Brock’s victim, her focus was all about what might happen to Brock if he went to prison, and how he wasn’t happy any more, why did this happen to him…yep. Carleen Turner wondered aloud “why this happened to him.” Carleen Turner was also bereft because, as Carleen wrote, “I can’t decorate my new house.” The tragedy of it. But it doesn’t stop there. Turner’s friends also chimed in. Good English band drummer and childhood friend, Leslie Rassmussen doubled-down on Brock’s behalf.
      G. So, given the evidence, I’ve concluded the Turners live in a Bubble in Ohio. Interestingly, although I’ve repeatedly asked, the name of the Probation Officer who recommended a wrist-slap, and his or her background, local media is protecting. I find that not just bad journalism, but evidence of Stanford’s continuing influence.
      H. As an aside, both families are long-time Republicans. Vandenburg’s family is a bit more right-wing.
      I. Last – do I think only one parent will break their denial. Vandenburg’s Mother. Also, it seems to be reality is finally settling in…but in a twisted way. At sentencing, Brock maintained the sex was consensual – a bump up from his original, “nothing happened.” Brock’s parents are clear on one thing: That their rapist son’s life will be harder. But they’re angry about that and fail to see it’s not a good look. Except for the bubble town they reside in Ohio.

      But as for Rod Vandenburg? Never. Remember Rod Vandenburg is so clueless he actually thought wearing a Hawaiian shirt to a trial was okay. Sometimes it’s the little things that become dead give-aways. I do not think Rod has, or is interested in acquiring, a conscience.

      Hope that answers your questions. Thanks again for reading.

      Like

  24. dglavin96 says:

    That answers my question and then some! I’ve been trying to block the Turner case from my thoughts so I don’t get too incensed. I just hope the effort to recalll the judge is successful.

    I had the same reaction to the O.J. Simpson case. I couldn’t bring myself to watch the miniseries or documentary that aired recently. I just hope the Vandenberg case ends with a sentence that fits the crimes.

    Like

    • The process of judicial nullification has already begun as jurors are refusing to be assigned to his courtroom.
      There’s more than one way to get rid of a judge. But for the record, updates on pervy Judge Michael Aaron Persky, can be found, here.

      Also, just attended a legal-journalism event featuring the always Fabulous Linda Deutsch, and Law Professor, Laurie Levenson. They covered the OJ cases. The event was quite popular. Pictures are here, if you’re interested. Every reporter who knows Linda says she’s best and most generous in the business. I am proud she calls me her friend. But I am every bit as big a fan of hers too. In fact, I could be president of her fan club. 🙂

      Like

  25. 123 says:

    I have no idea how I lucked out and stumbled upon your blog. IT’S AWESOME!!! You have a new daily follower.

    I don’t know if it’s true but I’ve read that Brock Turner’s Probation Officer was Monica Lassettre.

    Like

  26. dglavin96 says:

    Just reading reports that Vandenburg’s sentencing hearing has been pushed back to September 30. I was looking forward to seeing him get his just desserts next week. Batey’s sentencing will move forward on July 15. I suppose Batey’s sentence will give some clue as to what Vandenburg will get. I don’t know about you, but I can’t imagine any scenario where Vandenburg would get less time than Batey.

    Batey’s attorney Worrick Robinson attempted to withdraw from the case during the court appearance today. This has been reported as an attempt by Batey to fire his attorney. Batey asked to address the court during the hearing today, but was denied. It seems like he’s pulling out all the stops to avoid the inevitable punishment.

    On another topic, do you have any insight into why Mackenzie and Banks not only are walking the streets, but apparently playing football at other schools? Were they released on bond after their arrests? I can’t find anything on this.

    Like

    • 123 says:

      “I can’t imagine any scenario where Vandenburg would get less time than Batey.” I agree. (Then again, I’m no expert.)

      “It seems like he’s pulling out all the stops to avoid the inevitable punishment.” Not being an expert, an you tell me how firing his attorney, at this point, would help him? Also, is said attorney the woman who was pregnant? If not, who was she?

      Thanks!

      Like

      • dglavin96 says:

        Worrick Robinson was the attorney Batey attempted to fire. I presume the intent was to delay the sentencing. He tried the same thing before his second trial. There’s a brief clip of Robinson speaking on this on the WSMV website.

        Like

  27. dglavin96 says:

    I found raw video of this morning’s hearing from Court Chatter on YouTube. There were several interesting tidbits. The judge stated that the prosecution is not seeking consecutive sentencing, so the only issue will be the range of punishment. Batey was seeking to fire both of his attorneys (Worrick and Teasley) and hire another attorney named Peter Strianse to handle the sentencing and appeal. Strianse ultimately declined when it became clear that the sentencing hearing would not be continued to a later date. Worrick’s motion to withdraw was denied and he was ordered to stay on the case through the sentencing. Teasley was not at the hearing, but the judge stated that he would order her to appear at sentencing. Apparently she’d worked on the case as a “volunteer”–she attempted to get state funds, but was never paid because a defendant is not entitled to a second lawyer.

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  28. dglavin96 says:

    Robinson is no Clarence Darrow, but he seems like a decent guy. He has little to work with in this case and seems to be hampered by Batey and his family at every turn. Teasley is a disaster. I found her demeanor and behavior during the trial extremely annoying and at times offensive. Her chart comparing Batey with the victim was particularly galling. I’d love to know what the jurors thought of this.

    Like

    • 123 says:

      I second your assessment of Teasley yet I would not have used such measured terms describing her “performance.” Watching her drove me absolutely insane; I could barely contain myself.

      What was her angle here, since she didn’t get paid? She thought she would be paid? National TV exposure? Thinking he was innocent or getting a raw deal? Feeling that an advocate of the same race, and a woman, would be an advantage/better support for him through this?

      Did she/they convince him he’d get off completely or get off with a slap on the wrist? I felt that he was genuinely shocked it ended the way it did. I think he should have been found guilty on all charges, and Teasley guilty of aggravating everyone (except Batey but maybe he couldn’t stand her either.

      Assuming the jury leaned into “reasonable doubt,” I heard a commentator for another trial explain that juries get confused between “reasonable doubt” and “a reason to doubt”. Sad to say, that’s a distinction I would have missed were I a juror myself. No one testified to actually seeing any skin of his penis touching her lips or going into her mouth, which is to me “a reason to doubt”. In the context of the many details of what was going on that were testified to, as well as common sense, to me there was NO “reasonable doubt.”

      I always appreciate your comments.

      Like

      • dglavin96 says:

        I’d guess Teasley was motivated by all of the factors you cited. Two of the Batey jurors were interviewed by the Tennessean and said they had to negotiate a compromise with one holdout juror who “refused to see the evidence that was so obvious to everyone else.”. The other 11 wanted to convict Batey on all counts.

        Like

  29. Moms Hugs says:

    Caught up on all the posts here & have only this to say… due to that one holdout juror, Batey got by by the skin of his ….

    Like

    • dglavin96 says:

      Fortunately he was convicted of one count of aggravated rape, so the end result could be the same as if he were found guilty as charged on all counts. We’ll see what the judge does.

      Like

      • Moms Hugs says:

        JMHO here, but considering Judge Watkins has been put through a lot by their attorney’s, not to mention 3 TRIALS, I would not expect him to feel kindly toward Batey. Yes, we will see what the judge does, but I would not be at all surprised if he compensates for his own bias by being a bit more lenient in sentencing Batey.

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    • dglavin96 says:

      Judge Watkins strikes me as a highly professional jurist. His control of the courtroom and consideration for jurors’ time is markedly different than judges in other high profile trials I’ve followed. I have to believe he’s seen a lot of poor lawyering in his career and doesn’t let this create bias either way. Everyone describes the acts shown in the videos in this case as “horrific” and deserving of harsh punishment. I’m hoping for at least 20 years for both Batey and Brandenburg. More than that would be a bonus.

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  30. dglavin96 says:

    I came across this Facebook post from Shawna Vandenburg from October of 2014. It no longer appears on her page, so I assume she deleted it. Hopefully this means she’s no longer deluding herself. “We have been waiting nearly 18 months for everyone to know some of the true facts in this case. We have sat and listened to the various misnomers circulating around, that Brandon assaulted this girl, videotaped it and ask others to join. This could not be FURTHER from the TRUTH! Brandon did not even know the names of these men prior to this night and was only asking for help due to the condition he was in. The irony is that the DA’s office defends their position to charge Brandon with being held criminally responsible for the actions of others. However, where is the logic in holding him accountable for the two mens actions, who will walk free in exchange for their ” truthful testimony” against Brandon? This is comparable to a drunk driver killing someone and his drunk passenger being charged with the murder, while the driver who IS responsible for the action walks free. Does this sound like this is a case that is driven by a sense of justice?…”
    Along from the outrageousness of the facts in this case, the delusional behavior of the parents really drives me crazy.

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  31. christopher loman says:

    yikes

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  32. christopher loman says:

    forgive him Fathrt

    Like

  33. dglavin96 says:

    Shawna Vandenburg’s post was not complete at the first place I found it. This is the full post: “We have been waiting nearly 18 months for everyone to know some of the true facts in this case. We have sat and listened to the various misnomers circulating around, that Brandon assaulted this girl, videotaped it and ask others to join. This could not be FURTHER from the TRUTH! Brandon did not even know the names of these men prior to this night and was only asking for help due to the condition he was in. The irony is that the DA’s office defends their position to charge Brandon with being held criminally responsible for the actions of others. However, where is the logic in holding him accountable for the two mens actions, who will walk free in exchange for their “truthful testimony” against Brandon? This is comparable to a drunk driver killing someone and his drunk passenger being charged with murder, while the driver who IS responsible for the action walks free. Does this sound like a case that is driven by a sense of justice? Sadly, we have arrived at a time in our history where power and corruption often outweigh what is both logical and fair. Brandon absolutely did not touch this girl inappropriately and nor told anyone to do so. He did not have any sort of relationship with these 3 men or even know their names prior to the date in question. Suffering the repercussions of having little experience with the effects of drinking a massive amount of alcohol, while mixed with the gullibility that those around you always have “good intentions” was the aberration he made that night”

    Note that she refers to the victim as “this girl,” as if she is a non-entity. One would think Brandon Vandenburg’s lawyers would have been in possession of the prosecution’s evidence by October of 2014. I suppose he could have used attorney-client privilege to keep the evidence from his parents, but it’s hard to believe Shawna knew nothing of the true facts until they came out at trial. Hopefully she gets it after 2 trials and 24 jurors have concluded her son is guilty.

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  34. Mary Smith says:

    Hey, Bonnie ..My thanks also for your illuminating posts. I must caution you, however: You mention that both the Vandenberg and Turner families are “long – time Republicans”. I feel you degraded your own very good journalism and research by mentioning this. Are you trying to shame all Republicans by saying that this is how most Republicans would behave? I am a “long – time Republican” and abhor what these 2 men did. Personally, I think both should be hung in the public square.If I lived in their areas I would be there everyday , in front of their family homes, with a bull- horn and sign , telling everyone where they lived and decrying their attitudes and the rapes their sons committed. You must stop this Liberal bias of YOUR OWN and realize that the topic at hand has nothing to do with what you think about a certain group, in this case, a political party. And if you want to talk about rapists….Hey… The Democrat Kennedy Bros – one of whom is responsible for the death of Marilyn Monroe – is a good place to start.

    So, again I ask: What was your intention of mentioning that these two families are “long – time Republicans”: Was it to shame all Republicans? Please answer my specific question as what you say is very, very mean- spirited and uncalled – for.

    Like

    • Christopher Loman says:

      I think she might have been referring to the delicious irony of a get tough on crime republican weeping for his rapeist son

      Like

  35. Chelsea says:

    Also Rod may have given Brandon roofies to use on girls in High School, saying “it loosens women up”. http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2016/11/04/brandon-vandenburg-sentenced-17-years-vanderbilt-rape-case/91113160/

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